Tag Archives: wetland treasures

Message from the President

Dearest wetland supporters:

Just wanted to say a big thank you for all your support. 2019 was a big year for us as we were able to start several new projects and will be starting others in 2020. We cannot do this without your support, both financially and in volunteering.

A major effort that Carolina Wetlands Association was working with the Natural and Working Lands initiative started by the Governor’s office and managed by NC DEQ. This is a stakeholder group of state and federal agencies, NGOs and nonprofits, and experts from academia. Kim Matthews, Heather Clarkson and I work on this effort all year long and recommendations are currently being written up.

The recommendations focus on forest and wetland restoration to sequester more carbon, the co-benefits that result in terms of ecosystem services (such as water quality, flood control, etc.), and the building of community resilience. Along with these recommendations, are many policy suggestions such as expanding the floodplain buyout program to include farms, environmental equity, public outreach and education and the role of citizen science. I was also invited to attend a meeting of the US Climate Alliance in Washington, DC a part of the NC delegation.

From the Natural and Working Lands effort and with meeting with many other environmental organization in the state, Carolina Wetlands Association has taken on the challenge to develop a workshop to educate local decision makers about wetland value, their place in nature-based solutions and how they help build community resilience. The first version of the workshop was presented at the SeaGrant Coastal Conference in Wilmington in November. Amanda Johnson, David Shouse, Kim Mathews and I attended the meeting and presented the workshop. Very valuable feedback was received and the workshop will be updated. It is likely that NC Office of Recovery and Resiliency will partner with us on this workshop which we view as important to implementing the recommendations of the Natural and Working Lands initiative.

We also did our normal events to advocate for wetlands at Cary Arbor day, Reptile and Amphibian day at the NC Natural Science Museum, Bass Lake Day, meet and greet events in Asheville and Durham.

Plans for a SC Wetlands Matter event is being planed for March in Georgetown. There are also plans being made to have a similar Wetlands Matter event in Hilton Head Island, SC with the Coastal Discovery Museum and the HHI Land Trust later in 2020.

Carolina Wetlands Association was a sponsor to the WRRI conference in March for the second straight year. We had one session with four wetland papers and we had a panel discussion with Geoff Gisler (Southern Environmental Law Center and Carolina Wetlands Association), Norton Webster (Carolina Wetlands Association), Phil May (Carolina Ecology), and Michael Flynn (NC Coastal Federation) about the rule changes to the waters of the US (WOTUS).

The Association also was a sponsor for the America Ecological Engineering Society (AEES) annual meeting in Asheville in June. This was a great conference with Kim Matthews, Norton Webster and I attending. We were able to get quite a few ecological engineering/restoration companies interested in Carolina Wetlands as well as many of the attendees. The AEES is a national organization.

This past year also saw our newest Wetland Treasure selections: Bluff Mountain Fen (Ash County, NC), Croatan National Forest (Craven, Carteret, and Jones Counties, NC), Merchants Mill Pond (Gates County, NC), Santee Coastal Preserve (Charleston County, SC), and Woods Bay (Florence, Clarendon, and Sumter counties, SC). The wetland treasure tours were well attended, and all had a great time learning about their area wetlands.

Early in the year there were several meetings between Carolina Wetlands, RTI International and NC State University to talk about a grant to develop a volunteer wetland monitoring program. Michael Burchell and Natalie Nelson of NCSU, Kim Matthews of RTI and Carolina Wetlands Association, and I wrote an EPA Wetlands Program Development grant and was awarded the grant in June. We will be starting work on developing that volunteer wetland monitoring program with a few of our wetland treasures in 2020. This is a major accomplishment for the organization and will provide a project that will hopefully be sustainable with several sources of funding.

We will need to continue to have your support in 2020 as this will be our best year yet. We are making a difference. If you have not made your financial contribution, please do so and contact us if you want to help out on any of these projects.

Happy New Year and start the new year by exploring a wetland.
Rick

May: Message from the PResident

Wetland Supporters:

May is American Wetland Month, so I hope you all are celebrating our wetlands and the value they bring to us all.  We have had two of our Wetland Treasure tours, Woods Bay and Santee Coastal Preserve, both in SC, and they were a lot of fun.  Thanks to everyone who participated. The tours were very informative and attendees learned a lot about our wetlands. We have three more tours to go so be sure to check them out; there is open space for the tours at Croatan National Forest and Merchants Mill Pond.

Also during American Wetland Month, we hope you will remember your organization.  We are completing our 3-year Strategic Plan and will be taking steps to implement the plan.  We will make it available publicly once the Board approves it in July. In order to implement the plan, we will need much more funding and people resources and that is where you come into play.  Please consider making a donation to the organization during American Wetlands Month, both financially and time! Let us hear from you.

Now go out and explore a wetland!

Rick

Press Release: Celebrate Wetland Treasures this Spring!

Raleigh, NC –  Carolina Wetlands Association joins wetlands enthusiasts all over the country to raise public awareness about the beauty and importance of the nation’s wetlands during April, Earth Month. To promote the importance of wetland ecosystems, the Carolina Wetlands Association announces its fourth class of Wetland Treasures of the Carolinas. Wetland Treasures contain ecologically valuable wetlands, protected by conservation plans, and diversity of plants and animals.

“We are thrilled to celebrate these Wetland Treasures,” said Carrie Caviness, coordinator of this project. “We hope Carolinians will take pride in our wetland heritage, and we owe a great deal of gratitude to the organizations and agencies that are protecting these natural treasures,” said Caviness. The 2019 Wetland Treasures of the Carolinas are as follows (click on links to view a factsheet):

“We are offering tours of all our 2019 wetland treasure sites starting the first weekend in May thru June 8. We invite Carolinians to come experience the beauty, wonder and ecology of wetlands up close with us,” said Rick Savage, President of the Carolina Wetlands Association. Field tours details are listed above, as well as on the Carolina Wetlands Association website at carolinawetlands.org.

Wetlands play an important role in both the ecology and economy of the Carolinas. They are beautiful, magical places and are sanctuaries for people and wildlife. These hardworking ecosystems provide natural flood control and filter runoff, which helps keep our rivers, lakes, and drinking water clean.

Carolina Wetlands Association thanks the Wisconsin Wetlands Association, whose Wetland Gems program is the model for this program. Carolina Wetlands Association promotes the understanding, protection, restoration, and enjoyment of North and South Carolina’s wetlands and associated ecosystems through science-based programs, education, and advocacy. More information online at carolinawetlands.org.

Contact: Rick Savage, President, Carolina Wetlands Association rick.savage@carolinawetlands.org, carolinawetlands.org

2019 Wetland Treasures of the Carolinas

The Carolina Wetlands Association is proud to announce our 2019 Wetland Treasures of the Carolinas.  Through the Wetland Treasures of the Carolinas program, the Carolina Wetlands Association seeks to increase public awareness and appreciation of wetlands, and generate community pride in and commitment to stewardship of wetlands that have regional, national and even international importance.

The 2019 Wetland Treasures are located in both North and South Carolina and are found in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountains.  These wetlands sites are importnat to protecting biodiversity, are ecologically high-quality, and provide significant ecosystem services.    

  • Bluff Mountain Fen in Ashe County, NC
    • Wetland Type: Southern Appalachian Fen
    • Unique Feature: Only known wetland type in the region
  • Croatan National Forest in Craven, Carteret, and Jones counties, NC
      •  Wetland Type: Pocosin (dominate type)
      • Unique Feature: Approximately 75% of the Croatan may be considered wetlands with pocosins comprising the majority of the wetland acreage.
  • Merchants Millpond in Gates County, NC
    • Wetland Type: Cypress-Gum Swamp (Blackwater)
    • Unique Feature: Created 190 years ago, a coastal pond and southern swamp forest mingle, creating one of North Carolina’s rarest ecological communities.
  • Santee Coastal Preserve in Charleston County, SC
    •  Wetland Type: Freshwater Cypress Swamp
    • Unique Feature: Once a rice plantation, this reserve provides essential habitat for many species of wildlife.
  • Woods Bay in Florence, Clarendon, and Sumter counties, SC
    • Wetland Type: Carolina Bay
    • Unique Feature: One of the last remaining, relatively undisturbed, large Carolina bays on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain.

More information about the Wetland Treasures of the Carolina program including factsheets highlighting each site and directions on our website.  Stayed tune for more information about field tours to each of these Wetland Treasure sites in May and June.

We hope to see you in a wetland this spring!

Jessica Tisdale and Carrie Caviness
Carolina Wetlands Association

March Wetland Treasure of the Month: Lewis Ocean Bay

Minutes away from humming highways of Myrtle Beach and surrounded by the bustling urban development of Horry County, a natural wonderland and oasis flourish at SCDNR’s Lewis Ocean Bay Heritage Preserve. The 10,427 acre preserve protects Carolina bay/longleaf pine ecosystem complex that contains South Carolina’s best assemblage of Carolina bays. The preserve is linked via several swamp corridors to the Waccamaw River. These isolated wetlands provide essential food, water, cover, and space for many species, not to mention providing ecosystem services to the surrounding urban interface including flood mitigation, clean air, and recreation. This preserve not only provides wildlife viewing; it also provides hunting opportunities for the public.

Biodiversity

This is a fire-adapted ecosystem and prescribed burning continues to play a major role in shaping the ecosystem today. Fire favors herbaceous plants such as fly traps, pitcher plants and native orchids. The preserve is home to several rare species, including Venus fly trap, savannah milkweed, pitcher plants and the federally endangered red-cockaded woodpecker.

Water Supply

The natural lands of the Lewis Ocean Bay Heritage Preserve protect the water supply of nearby urban areas.

Recreation

The preserve is open to the public from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. This is a great place to go for hike and a good place to view birds.

For more information

2016 Wetland Treasures Announced

CarWA is thrilled to recognize and celebrate our inaugural class of Wetland Treasures sites! Click the links below to open a fact sheet and learn about the ecology, significance, flora and fauna, and more for each site:

Join us for one of our field trips in May. Click here for more information.

 

Photo Credit: Skip Pudney (Green Swamp; Brunswick County, NC)